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In Case You Missed it April 28, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets that might be worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

In Case You Missed it April 7, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets that might be worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Seeing Through the Fog: Forgiveness and Collective Apologies

In a series of studies social psychologists examined group forgiveness and found that individuals are astute perceivers of political process. For an apology to be sincere, the process must show that the offenders are in agreement about the apology and that the person(s) saying sorry for the group represents the whole group.

Donald Trump and the Rise of White Identity in Politics

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By Eric D. Knowles, New York University and Linda R. Tropp, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Psychology News Round-Up (October 21st)

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This week on the blog, Anup Gamba discusses why political ideology undermines logical reasoning. Our C&C Posts Not To Miss section includes the answer to the question, is the internet making you mean, explores what we talk about when we talk about morality, and has a timely throwback to judging political hearts and minds.                   

Psychology News Round-Up (October 14th)

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This Week on the Blog

Our knowledge of how people communicate online and the motivations behind it is still in its inchoate stage. Check out this week’s post to see if the internet is making you mean.

Why Do Groups Protect Immoral Group Members?

illustration representing the concept of protection
When a fellow group member behaves immorally, some people may prioritize protecting their group over other moral principles. Who are those people?

Receptivity to Nonsense Varies across the Political Spectrum

Man shouting through bullhorn blah blah
The link between people’s political views and how likely they are to fall for nonsense is more complicated than previously thought.

Fake News Can Distort Your Memories

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Exposure to fake news can create false memories, especially when the stories are in line with our beliefs.

People See Things as They Expect Them to Be—But that Doesn’t Have to Spell Political Disaster

Three times figure-ground perception, face and vase.
A classic study in social psychology revealed that we cannot always trust our perceptions. Nonetheless, there are some good ways to uncover the truth. And doing so might help us reduce political polarization.

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