You are here

person perception

Hunter-gatherers Agree on What is Moral, but not Who is Moral

Morality plays a role in everyday lives, from interactions with friends and strangers, to political views and social influences. Social psychologists from the University of Pennsylvania wanted to know whether there was a universal concept of moral character, by looking beyond Western populations. According to their work with the Hadza hunter-gatherers in Tanzania, the Hadza agree on which traits are relevant to moral character, but not on who has character.

Failure of Female Role Models Affects Beliefs about Women More Generally

Illustration of woman falling off pedastal
Role models are not superhuman, and they sometimes fail. Although we might accept their imperfections, we do not expect that other people will treat them the same.

Why do People Believe in the “True Self”?

kitten looks in a mirror sees reflection of a tiger
Although intuitively appealing, the belief that each person has a true self may be just a quirk of the human mind.

Wearing Luxury Brands Might Give the Wrong Impression

Luxury Watches
Luxury brands are highly sought-after status symbols, but they may be making you less likeable and employable.

Beyond First Appearances

Two men shaking hands
It takes less than 5 minutes of interacting to improve a first impression.

How to Give Away Your Cake and Eat It Too

Person taking slice of fresh delicious colorful cake at table, top view
Allowing others to distribute resources can increase your chances of getting what you want.

In The Blink of an Eye: People Perceive Sex Ratio and Threat of Group in Less Than a Second

In almost as quickly as it takes to blink an eye, we make assumptions about a group of people. New research from UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shows people perceive the sex ratio of a group, and decide if the group is threatening or not, in half a second. The perceptions of the number of men in the group are accurate, according to the research.

Nicholas Alt (UCLA), Brianna Mae Goodale (UCLA), David J Lick (New York University) and Kerri Johnson (UCLA) conducted the research. The results appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Real Men Don’t Say “Cute”

Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

Pages