You are here

morality

The Good and Evil of Ghosts, Governments, and Machines

Portland, Oregon - Good and evil may spring from the human mind, but new research reveals how they extend beyond humans to the artificial and supernatural.

Good Ghosts on the Mountains, Evil Spirits in the Caves

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI January 18, 2019

Feature Image

Highlights this week include the roots of anger, what morality does to humor, and the science of statistics anxiety. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI December 21, 2018

Feature Image

Why do we avoid chores, how do we deal with people we don't like, and more gift advice ahead in this final roundup of 2018.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. We'll kick things off again in January.

Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage

From online forums to community groups, research and experience shows people are more willing to insult and use menacing language online than in person, especially when there’s the protection of anonymity behind a computer. New research appearing in Social Psychological and Personality Science indicates that people react less strongly to malicious speech on digital platforms and see the victims as less “harmed” than if the words were said directly to a person.

Designing to Avoid “Ordinary Unethicality”: A Q&A with Yuval Feldman

Illustration of man split between a large X and a Check Mark

Yuval Feldman, the Mori Lazarof Professor of Legal Research at Bar-Ilan University Law School in Israel, recently published the book The Law of Good People: Challenging States’ Ability to Regulate Human Behavior. The book examines how behavioral ethics could change legal design and enforcement. I started by asking him to explain what he means by “behavioral ethics.”

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI August 17, 2018

Feature Image

This week's round-up includes a look at the recent problem with bots completing online surveys. See what else you may have missed online.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI August 10, 2018

Feature Image

In the news this week: the benefits of uncertainty, procrastination, slacking at work, and cats. See what else you may have missed online.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

When Does Living a Moral Life Lead to a Flourishing Life?

Image of compass pointing to "What is my purpose?"

How can we live a meaningful and purposeful life? Answering this question can significantly contribute to our long-term well-being. Recent research in positive psychology among diverse populations unequivocally suggests that living a more meaningful and purposeful life predicts better physical and mental health.

How Women and Men’s Different Emotional Experiences Shape Moral Decisions

Image of man and woman sitting on floor, back-to-back, thinking

Negative stereotypes about women’s emotionality have persisted throughout history, leading to many damaging myths about their decision-making capacities in the social, professional, and political sphere.  Historically, women’s emotionality was also considered to undermine their ability to make moral decisions.  Women were often viewed as morally inferior to men because they based moral judgments on emotion rather than logic.  In stark contrast to this early view, we now know that self-conscious moral emotions, like guilt, are critical to moral judgment and moral behavior (

You Don’t Need To Believe In Free Will to Be a Nice Person, Shows New Research

Washington, DC - Contrary to a widely-held view in psychology and other fields of research, belief in free will appears to be unrelated to moral behavior. Social psychologist Damien Crone from the University of Melbourne and Philosophy professor Neil Levy of Macquarie University and the University of Oxford conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person’s moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. The results will appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science this month.

Pages