You are here

emotion

Thinking and Feeling In Judging Others

By Alexander Danvers

You’re interviewing a stranger for a job, and while you have “the facts” about their previous job history in front of you, what you’re not sure about is their emotional state. Are they anxious? Excited? Bored?

Agreeable Personalities are More Likely to Help Strangers

Prosocial behaviors, such as willingness to help others, may be linked to specific personalities.  Based on new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, agreeableness is one of the better predictors of prosocial behavior.

Pride: Strength or Sin? The Impact of Nonverbal Displays of Pride on Hiring Decisions

A woman smiles confidently as she responds to an interview question

Picture this. You’re sitting in a job interview talking to someone who will help determine whether or not you get the job. They start asking you about something on your resume – a project you’re particularly proud of, one that you worked really hard on. You can’t help it: you start to lift your head a little higher, sit up straight, pull back your shoulders, puff out your chest. But will this nonverbal display of pride actually help you get the job?

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI February 1, 2019

Feature Image

 

Next week ICMYI takes a two-week break for the SPSP 20th Annual Convention. Get ready for coverage from our team of science writers, and follow along with #SPSP2019.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI January 18, 2019

Feature Image

Highlights this week include the roots of anger, what morality does to humor, and the science of statistics anxiety. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

Aggressive Behavior Brings Emotional Pain to the Sadist

Washington, DC - People with sadistic personality traits tend to be aggressive, but only enjoy their aggressive acts if it harms their victims. According to a series of studies of over 2000 people, these actions ultimately leave sadists feeling worse than they felt before their aggressive act. 

The research appears in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Hate: Dropping the H-Bomb

Image of four type pieces spelling out HATE

“Hate” – the term is becoming an all too familiar. “Hate group” members and sympathizers use “hate speech” and commit “hate crimes.” Recent events on the worldwide sociopolitical landscape have revealed the often intensely visceral reactions people have when they see actions that they consider to be hate. The three little words – “I HATE you” – can damage interpersonal, intergroup, and international relationships in ways that “I am angry at you” or “I dislike you” cannot begin to match.

Pages